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Downforce & Aerodynamics (Read 2278 times)
Diesel
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Downforce & Aerodynamics
Jan 24th, 2007 at 5:42am
 
This is a basic approach how to choose downforce settings.

First of all, downforce creates a force aiming downwards onto the car pushing it onto the track. You will achieve 0N of downforce when standing still and it will increase along with the speed of the car. This means that at slow sections of a track, downforce will have less effect than on faster sections.

There's a benefit and a disadvantage when using downforce.

  • The benefit is that with downforce you will receive more traction, causing the car to respond quicker to steering (less understeer) and the tail will also be fish-tailing less (less oversteer). This will greatly improve cornering.

    The type of track where a large amount of downforce would prove beneficial is on tracks with plenty of tight corners and short straightaways. The corners can be taken with more control and traction enabling you to keep a higher speed throughout the corner and the straight parts of the track are short enough not to make a big impact on your acceleration.
  • The disadvantage would be the drag. Because of the downforce, your car will receive more friction with air causing less acceleration and a lower top speed. Your tyres will also be pushed down because of the downforce, creating a larger contact area of the rubber of the tires onto the road, wich respectively also creates more drag, along with a more rapid heating of the tyres wich will wear them out quicker. This means that on straight parts of the track, you do not benefit at all and will only be affected negatively by the downforce.

    The type of track where a small amount of downforce (even zero) would prove beneficial is on tracks with mainly fast corners and large straightaways. The increased traction and reduced oversteer/understeer would not give a big advantage as the corners have a small angle. Also, the increased air and tyre friction would not have a big effect since the downforce is minimal.


A final note is that due to personal preference and driving style, you can respectively choose the amount of downforce on the rear and the front. Some drivers can cope with more oversteer but need their front traction for cornering, they choose to use a higher amount on the front than the rear. And vice versa.

Class dismissed. Questions are welcome.
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Dan
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Re: Downforce & Aerodynamics
Reply #1 - Jan 24th, 2007 at 10:01am
 
Anybody here know how the test speed works? And why it is always defaults to 40?
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lok
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Re: Downforce & Aerodynamics
Reply #2 - Jan 24th, 2007 at 10:15am
 
Dan wrote on Jan 24th, 2007 at 10:01am:
Anybody here know how the test speed works? And why it is always defaults to 40?


I believe its used by imputing your average speed on any one track, then you able to set your downforce to a general area that would best work there. Test and tune for more minor adjustments after that.  Cool
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Re: Downforce & Aerodynamics
Reply #3 - Jan 24th, 2007 at 10:28am
 
Dan wrote on Jan 24th, 2007 at 10:01am:
Anybody here know how the test speed works? And why it is always defaults to 40?


its only there to give you some basic info of the df distribution at certain speeds

it will be of more use when/if those values become more dynic and are calculated on the actual aoa of the wing at that speed instead of the one you set
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Fangio
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Re: Downforce & Aerodynamics
Reply #4 - Feb 9th, 2007 at 10:28pm
 
Quote:
Your tyres will also be pushed down because of the downforce, creating a larger contact area of the rubber of the tires onto the road, wich respectively also creates more drag, along with a more rapid heating of the tyres wich will wear them out quicker.


This is right, but i would like to add a usefull tip. There is a way to balance the setup wich takes the relation betwen downforce-tyre pressure. Why is this? becoz if u use very low downforce u ll burn your tires worse than high downfoce, just becoz the grip decreasse to much and the tire just slip on the track. So a good way to get good performance on the set is be aware of how much pressure can hold a best downforce settings. How do we know the best downforce settings? imo the unique way is testing with the faster tyres allowed for that car, once u get the car working with that tyres (what we call hotlap or qualify set) u start working on the tyre wearing.

Note: this is what i do, isnt really necesary if u like how the car reacts with low downforce values.

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Nismosis
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Re: Downforce & Aerodynamics
Reply #5 - Nov 9th, 2008 at 10:19am
 
Fangio wrote on Feb 9th, 2007 at 10:28pm:
Quote:
Your tyres will also be pushed down because of the downforce, creating a larger contact area of the rubber of the tires onto the road, wich respectively also creates more drag, along with a more rapid heating of the tyres wich will wear them out quicker.


This is right, but i would like to add a usefull tip. There is a way to balance the setup wich takes the relation betwen downforce-tyre pressure. Why is this? becoz if u use very low downforce u ll burn your tires worse than high downfoce, just becoz the grip decreasse to much and the tire just slip on the track. So a good way to get good performance on the set is be aware of how much pressure can hold a best downforce settings. How do we know the best downforce settings? imo the unique way is testing with the faster tyres allowed for that car, once u get the car working with that tyres (what we call hotlap or qualify set) u start working on the tyre wearing.

Note: this is what i do, isnt really necesary if u like how the car reacts with low downforce values.


Sorry for the bump, this one is interesting to me.  Smiley

I would also like to add a useful tip.
  If a car is set up to slightly understeer in fast bends - an indispensable requirement if the car is to be drivable in such conditions - it will inevitably understeer excessively in tight turns. Thanks to the adjustable aerodynamic aids, this can be mostly avoided. For this it is necessary that the aerodynamic devices are adjusted to produce more down force over the rear axle than over the front axle. The Chassis can then be adjusted not to understeer excessively in tight turns, and as the down force and consequently the grip will increase as the square of the cars speed more rapidly on the rear axle then on the front axle, the car will understeer more as the speed increases. it will thus remain stable in fast, large radius bends without the excessive understeer in tight turns.
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